Posted in Member Profile

K.F. Stubert

Name: Kenneth F. Stubert
Genres: Fiction – Action/ Suspense/ Travel

What has been your most rewarding moment as an author?

My most rewarding moment came when someone introduced me as, “His favorite writer.” Other highlights were having my books passed along to others, someone saying, “The book should be made into a movie,” and several people asking, “When is your next book coming out?”

What kind of research goes into writing your novels and how much time does it take?

I write contemporary fiction about present day countries, cities, and locales. I want my story to be real, so I’ll research train schedules, flights, current economic conditions, political positions, maps, and so forth. I research these as I come to that point in the book. An hour of research usually creates a paragraph or two. By the time I’m done, I have a two-inch folder of research papers. I believe accurate, up-to-date research is necessary to make the story real, but it takes a lot of time. Sometimes it can take an hour of research to get one sentence right.

What have been some of the biggest helps for developing your writing skills? Written resources, classes or conferences, fellow writers you’ve learned from or have mentored you, other?

My primary mentor is a retired English professor. He’s been a great help by making sure I continue in the right tense and utilize the correct adjective or adverb. He ensures I use correct grammar; he’s my “Comma Cop.” Others, including SGWL members, encourage me to continue writing. Thank you!

Have you ever based characters on real people? Give us a couple of examples.

I think of people I know that have large or unique personalities. I’ll take that person and expand his/ her quirks into the story. I try to visualize how the person would react to situations and circumstances, then convert and expand those reactions into the storyline.

In my first two books, I based a government agent on a friend. He’s gregarious, always smiling, very polite, and a born leader. I changed his background, education, and so forth, but expanded on his friendliness and willingness to help everyone.

In another story, a very large friend has an impressive appetite. In the story, he provides comic relief by always thinking about food. His standard reply is, “Big man, big appetite.”

What’s the best piece of writing-related advice that you’ve received?

That’s an easy one. “Write for yourself. If you like it, others will too.”

How do you find your ideas for a book?

This is probably different than most people. I come up with an opening line and just a small genesis of an idea. The settings are usually places I’ve lived or visited. From there I just start writing, building the story as I go. I don’t know the ending until I get there! The opening line of my first book, which the entire story is built around, is, “The body began to cool rapidly.”

What kind of books do you enjoy reading and how often do you read?

I’m not a prolific reader. I don’t make the time to write and read, so it’s one or the other. When I do read, I like historical fiction, non-fiction history, and light mysteries.

BIOGRAPHY:

My wife of over 52 years, Mary Lou, and I were born in Pittsburgh, PA. I served in the Navy for four years active duty, one of which was in Gaeta, Italy. We then lived in New England for over 40 years.

My hobbies include antique and classic cars, softball, church, and writing. We have two children, a son in Virginia, a daughter in Bee Cave and a total of five granddaughters! I retired from the millwork industry where I did a great deal of professional writing, traveling, and public speaking.

We have visited forty-seven countries and lived in two others. We moved to Sun City in 2013 and continue to travel as much as possible. Since moving to Texas, I’ve published two novels, Triangulation and Layers of Lies which are centered on the places we’ve visited and lived. Both books are available on Amazon.

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